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Decorative and industrial style unite under the same roof at Bar Deco. It is located in the Bulletin building, a spectacular printing house dating to 1928, in Washington D.C.’s Chinatown. Despite the fact that the building is being used for other purposes, its façade remains intact with parts of its original Art Deco mural. The dialogue between past and present begins before one even enters, where guests encounter a mural by Terry Knowles. The interior spaces were designed by Studio CORE, who used an interesting mix of classical and industrial style. The walls’ flaking imperfections and exposed brick serve as a background furniture that has contemporary lines, but retro details. The bar fills all four floors of the building. The ground floor is the entryway, the first has an expansive open kitchen, the second the dining room, the third a cocktail bar, and the last a rooftop bar with a fantastic view of the Nation’s capital.

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Bar Deco is located inside the Bulletin building, which was built in 1928. It is found in Washington D.C.’s Chinatown.
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Humorous neon lights on the ground floor show visitors where the Bar’s various areas are located.
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The front of the building maintains its original decorations.
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Large tables in the dining room allow for big groups to eat together, but there are more intimate spaces as well.
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Some of the decorative details that imitate the Art Deco style, including the lamps and railings, mix with industrial touches, like the exposed ceiling.
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The dining room on the second floor has exposed, imperfect walls and windows often found in buildings from the 1920’s.
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The four-storey mural pays homage to the building’s history.

WHERE: 717 6th St NW, Washington, DC 20001, USA

Decorative and industrial style unite under the same roof at Bar Deco. It is located in the Bulletin building, a spectacular printing house dating to 1928, in Washington D.C.’s Chinatown. Despite the fact that the building is being used for other purposes, its façade remains intact with parts of its original Art Deco mural. The dialogue between past and present begins before one even enters, where guests encounter a mural by Terry Knowles. The interior spaces were designed by Studio CORE, who used an interesting mix of classical and industrial style. The walls’ flaking imperfections and exposed brick serve as a background furniture that has contemporary lines, but retro details. The bar fills all four floors of the building. The ground floor is the entryway, the first has an expansive open kitchen, the second the dining room, the third a cocktail bar, and the last a rooftop bar with a fantastic view of the Nation’s capital.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.