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Castiglioni_Sanluca
Achille & Pier Giacomo Castiglioni, Sanluca, 1960. Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani e Marco Cappelletti
Rietveld_Zigzag
Gerrit Thomas Rietveld, Zig Zag, 1934. Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti

Visitable from this coming spring is a small and precious museum at via Borsi 9 in Milan (Navigli district). This museum houses the works of masters of design collected by Raffaello Biagetti (Firenze 1940 – Ravenna 2008), enlightened distributor of design furnishings. This is a hidden treasure brought to light by the Italian Museums Association. The curatorship of the collection was given into the hands of Professor Giovanni Klaus Koenig, who, together with Filippo Alison and Giuseppe Chigiotti, built up the collection involving well-known personalities such as Gae Aulenti, Dino Gavina and Piero Castiglioni.

Bellini_Bambolongue
Mario Bellini, Bambolongue, 1972 Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti
Mollino_Fenis
Carlo Mollino, Fenis, 1959. Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti

The museum recounts the history of design from 1880 to 1980 from Art Nouveau to the Viennese School, to Bauhaus, onto the 50’s and 60’s leading up to radical design, and then on to the Alchemia and Memphis movements. The collection of iconic pieces, built up through the personal passion of Raffaello Biagetti, has come to Milan from Ravenna thanks to the new association Musei italiani (Italian Museums Association), born with the objective of promoting Italian cultural heritage. As in every self-respecting museum, a coffee shop is not lacking, neither is a shop offering a selection of design items.

Design Museum interior 1880-1980, via Borsi 9, Milano. Credits: PH by Charlotte Hosmer
Pesce_Piede
Gaetano Pesce, Il piede, 1969!. Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti
Mendini_Proust
Alessandro Mendini, Proust armchair, 1979. Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti
Sottsass_Casablanca
Ettore Sottsass, Casablanca, 1980-1981 Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti
external view of Design Museum in Milano
Design Museum exterior view 1880-1980, via Borsi 9, Milano. Credits: PH by Charlotte Hosmer
Mackintosh_Bureau
Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Bureau, 1904 - Credits: PH by Delfino Sisto Legnani & Marco Cappelletti
Design Museum in Milan at VIa Borsi 9
Design Museum exterior view 1880-1980, via Borsi 9, Milano. Credits: PH by Charlotte Hosmer

WHERE: Design Museum 1880-1980, Via G. Borsi 9, Milan 20143

Visitable from this coming spring is a small and precious museum at via Borsi 9 in Milan (Navigli district). This museum houses the works of masters of design collected by Raffaello Biagetti (Firenze 1940 – Ravenna 2008), enlightened distributor of design furnishings. This is a hidden treasure brought to light by the Italian Museums Association. The curatorship of the collection was given into the hands of Professor Giovanni Klaus Koenig, who, together with Filippo Alison and Giuseppe Chigiotti, built up the collection involving well-known personalities such as Gae Aulenti, Dino Gavina and Piero Castiglioni.
The museum recounts the history of design from 1880 to 1980 from Art Nouveau to the Viennese School, to Bauhaus, onto the 50’s and 60’s leading up to radical design, and then on to the Alchemia and Memphis movements. The collection of iconic pieces, built up through the personal passion of Raffaello Biagetti, has come to Milan from Ravenna thanks to the new association Musei italiani (Italian Museums Association), born with the objective of promoting Italian cultural heritage. As in every self-respecting museum, a coffee shop is not lacking, neither is a shop offering a selection of design items.
WHERE: Design Museum 1880-1980, Via G. Borsi 9, Milan 20143

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.