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The New York Metropolitan Museum’s “Manus x Machina”, the Museo Salvatore Ferragamo’s “Tra arte e moda” in Florence, as well as Florentine museums and Prato’s textile museum have recently focused on exhibitions that explore the ties between fashion and other disciplines. In this case, they highlight those ties with art. Fashion has always been connected with a sense of observation, being that it is often considered ephemeral, seasonal, and vain, condemning it to be more futile than useful. Clothing, jewels and shoes are all effectively decorative utensils and objects, much like those in design, created to serve a purpose, the purpose of dressing and adorning the shape of one’s body. Jewelry, clothing and shoe designers not only exhibit creativity and imagination, but knowledge of anatomy and ergonomics, and a familiarity with geometry, modeling, draping, and a profound understanding of materials. Salvatore Ferragamo addresses this in his biography, stating that, “There is no limit of beauty or the saturation of one’s imagination, just as the infinite variety of materials that a shoemaker has to created his models. I have used fish scales, transparent paper, snail shells and raffia, raw silk, seaweed, and wool…”.

Cristina Morozzi

The New York Metropolitan Museum’s “Manus x Machina”, the Museo Salvatore Ferragamo’s “Tra arte e moda” in Florence, as well as Florentine museums and Prato’s textile museum have recently focused on exhibitions that explore the ties between fashion and other disciplines. In this case, they highlight those ties with art. Fashion has always been connected with a sense of observation, being that it is often considered ephemeral, seasonal, and vain, condemning it to be more futile than useful. Clothing, jewels and shoes are all effectively decorative utensils and objects, much like those in design, created to serve a purpose, the purpose of dressing and adorning the shape of one’s body. Jewelry, clothing and shoe designers not only exhibit creativity and imagination, but knowledge of anatomy and ergonomics, and a familiarity with geometry, modeling, draping, and a profound understanding of materials. Salvatore Ferragamo addresses this in his biography, stating that, “There is no limit of beauty or the saturation of one’s imagination, just as the infinite variety of materials that a shoemaker has to created his models. I have used fish scales, transparent paper, snail shells and raffia, raw silk, seaweed, and wool…”.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.