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The soft lighting is resolved with simple light bulbs hung at different heights. Photo Adrien Williams

At the end of the day, before going home after work, there are many people who like to get distracted by having a drink and perhaps a snack in the company of colleagues and friends. In Italy there are bars and taverns, pubs in England, in Spain the taperie … and in Japan the Izakaya!
Often less known to us in the West, these local informal cafes serve sake and beer accompanied with delicious dishes to share with friends: edamame (soybeans), Kyuri tofu (soy cheese with cucumber), yakitori (chicken skewers) and ebi mayo (fried shrimp), to name just a few.

The Izakaya Kinoya is an easy-going cafe, leading Canada in the custom of "cocktails Japanese style" sake or beer accompanied by small snacks that you can share with friends. Photo Adrien Williams
Long and narrow, with closely- spaced seating, the Izakaya Kinoya has bet on "shock socialization", seating people in close contact and thus encouraging new friendships. Photo Adrien Williams
The face of a samurai painted on the wall winks at the graffiti. Photo Adrien Williams

Because of the many people of Japanese origin, these traditional cafes are also prevalent in Canada. Jean de Lessard designed the interior of the Izakaya Kinoya in Montreal, betting on a style both aggressive and brusque but secure in its impact. The new diner occupies the space of a more “classic”, Japanese-style restaurant, from which the furniture and the floor have been retained.
But now entering the Izakaya Kinoya one has the impression of being in a wooden building built in a hurry. The irregular walls and ceilings arise from the combination of rough planks, decorated with drawings of samurai, giant octopuses and ideograms in strong tones of red and black. Although the space is narrow and the seats are very close to each other, it seems that the theory of “shock socialization” proposed by de Lessard has proven to work 100%: already, after only a few months following its opening the Kinoya has been sold out every evening.

The red lanterns, typical of the more traditional Izakaya, are here replaced by small banners with red and black decorations and ideograms. Photo Adrien Williams
The cafe, designed by Jean de Lessard, was born in the place of a more traditional-style Japanese restaurant. The environment is completely different, but the furnishings have been retained. Photo Adrien Williams

WHERE: 4250 Rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, QC H2J 2K8, Canada

At the end of the day, before going home after work, there are many people who like to get distracted by having a drink and perhaps a snack in the company of colleagues and friends. In Italy there are bars and taverns, pubs in England, in Spain the taperie … and in Japan the Izakaya!
Often less known to us in the West, these local informal cafes serve sake and beer accompanied with delicious dishes to share with friends: edamame (soybeans), Kyuri tofu (soy cheese with cucumber), yakitori (chicken skewers) and ebi mayo (fried shrimp), to name just a few.
Because of the many people of Japanese origin, these traditional cafes are also prevalent in Canada. Jean de Lessard designed the interior of the Izakaya Kinoya in Montreal, betting on a style both aggressive and brusque but secure in its impact. The new diner occupies the space of a more “classic”, Japanese-style restaurant, from which the furniture and the floor have been retained.
But now entering the Izakaya Kinoya one has the impression of being in a wooden building built in a hurry. The irregular walls and ceilings arise from the combination of rough planks, decorated with drawings of samurai, giant octopuses and ideograms in strong tones of red and black. Although the space is narrow and the seats are very close to each other, it seems that the theory of “shock socialization” proposed by de Lessard has proven to work 100%: already, after only a few months following its opening the Kinoya has been sold out every evening.
WHERE: 4250 Rue Saint-Denis, Montréal, QC H2J 2K8, Canada

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.