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The inside of the Fréderic Malle boutique in Marais seems to go on and on forever, thanks to a play of reflections and mirrors. Photo: Roland Halbe

A tiny store that seems to be an infinite, ethereal space, going on forever. In Marais, Paris, Frédéric Malle has opened a new boutique to house his high-end perfumes. The shop is on the first floor of a historic building. Malle says, “Every new boutique represents a meeting of the minds, a collaboration between myself and a carefully chosen architect whose work I greatly admire. The goal is one of perfect artistic union, in which our two worlds collide and intertwine…I’d always loved Dominique Jakob and Brendan MacFarlane’s work on the restaurant Georges at the Centre Pompidou in Paris.

The tables and displays seem to sprout from the ceiling and pavement. One finds themselves in a magical, parallel world, where the laws of physics are a little less rigid. Photo: Roland Halbe

A futuristic fantasy, it remains to this day as perfect and unexpected as it was fifteen years ago. But it wasn’t until I revisited the Florence Loewy bookstore in the Marais, home to a Jakob + MacFarlane-designed “hive” of plywood bookshelves, that it hit me: therein lay the spirit for our new Parisian boutique on the rue des Francs Bourgeois”. The architects amplified the space by installing oddly shaped wood forms that seem to sprout from the floor, walls and ceiling. The flooring is reflective and the walls are mirrored, allowing for the displays and tables to “float” in the space, like icebergs. These mysterious “islands” contain Malle’s exceptional, high quality perfumes, all created by some of the most experienced noses in the business.

Frédéric Malle quoted, “When we create or select a perfume, it will be with us for years. We must be calm, silent, and take our time”. Photo: Roland Halbe
Jacob + MacFarland designed the interior. Photo: Roland Halbe
The wooden installations house the perfumes, no one is alike, and they surround the tables and refrigerated cases. Photo: Roland Halbe
The boutique’s storefront window. Photo: Roland Halbe
Some of the perfumes, all created with the talents of some of the most experienced noses in the business, which focus on quality instead of naming or marketing. Photo: Roland Halbe
The wood structures look like mysterious islands. Photo: Roland Halbe

WHERE: 13 Rue des Francs Bourgeois, 75004 Paris, Francia

A tiny store that seems to be an infinite, ethereal space, going on forever. In Marais, Paris, Frédéric Malle has opened a new boutique to house his high-end perfumes. The shop is on the first floor of a historic building. Malle says, “Every new boutique represents a meeting of the minds, a collaboration between myself and a carefully chosen architect whose work I greatly admire. The goal is one of perfect artistic union, in which our two worlds collide and intertwine…I’d always loved Dominique Jakob and Brendan MacFarlane’s work on the restaurant Georges at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. A futuristic fantasy, it remains to this day as perfect and unexpected as it was fifteen years ago. But it wasn’t until I revisited the Florence Loewy bookstore in the Marais, home to a Jakob + MacFarlane-designed “hive” of plywood bookshelves, that it hit me: therein lay the spirit for our new Parisian boutique on the rue des Francs Bourgeois”. The architects amplified the space by installing oddly shaped wood forms that seem to sprout from the floor, walls and ceiling. The flooring is reflective and the walls are mirrored, allowing for the displays and tables to “float” in the space, like icebergs. These mysterious “islands” contain Malle’s exceptional, high quality perfumes, all created by some of the most experienced noses in the business.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.