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In pieno stile parigino, i tavolini del bistrot occupano parte della graziosa piazza su cui affaccia il locale. Foto Benoit Linero.

Trends come and go. The same could be said for interior design. Clean lines, light colours and general minimalism have dominated the scene, but as of recent, we have seen a return to “old fashioned” design. Decoration and textural finishes mix with shapes and forms of yesteryear that are updated, if not current. Located in a Haussmann building from 1854, it was fully restored by Philippe Mendoni. It looks out onto a wide cobblestone street, leading to a small square where tables are set up.

The bistrot offers fish and meat dishes, cooked in a wood-burning oven. Foto Benoit Linero.

The ground floor is an open space hosting a cocktail bar, reception area, and bistrot. The hotel’s 18 rooms are spread over six floors, and each room is more a pied-a-terre, a private apartment offering the comforts of home. Each has a bar cart, with a shaker, spirits, and an instruction booklet to make cocktails. Velvet, richly-decorated tapestries, refined furnishings and an almost obsessive attention to

Un angolo della lobby al piano terra. Foto Benoit Linero.
The rooms seem to more like apartments, dating to the Haussmann era. Foto Benoit Linero.
Crystal, glass furnishing, and antiques: the bistrot has all of this past century’s style. Foto Benoit Linero.
The eighteenth century building was restored by French architect Philippe Medioni. Foto Benoit Linero.
Wallpaper, velvet and antiques (or those that seem to be); every room has colours and details that give it character. Foto Benoit Linero.
The interior was decorated by Elodie Moussié and Sophia Richard. Foto Benoit Linero.
Every room has its own vintage character and aura. Foto Benoit Linero.
The rooms seem to be more like apartments, dating to the Haussmann era. Foto Benoit Linero.

WHERE: 90 Rue René Boulanger, 75010 Paris, Francia

Trends come and go. The same could be said for interior design. Clean lines, light colours and general minimalism have dominated the scene, but as of recent, we have seen a return to “old fashioned” design. Decoration and textural finishes mix with shapes and forms of yesteryear that are updated, if not current. Located in a Haussmann building from 1854, it was fully restored by Philippe Mendoni. It looks out onto a wide cobblestone street, leading to a small square where tables are set up. The ground floor is an open space hosting a cocktail bar, reception area, and bistrot. The hotel’s 18 rooms are spread over six floors, and each room is more a pied-a-terre, a private apartment offering the comforts of home. Each has a bar cart, with a shaker, spirits, and an instruction booklet to make cocktails. Velvet, richly-decorated tapestries, refined furnishings and an almost obsessive attention to detail make the Hôtel Providence a favourite amongst visitors to the French capital.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.