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New York’s Metropolitan Museum is showing a superb exhibition of 170 avant garde prêt-à-porter and haute couture pieces that highlight the relationship between handmade and machine made, pointing out the fertile, modern unity between artisan approach and technology in fashion. Curator Andrew Bolton expains that the collection dispels the dichotomy of hand and machine manufactuing, proposing a new paradigm for our digital age.

Nicolas Ghesquière (French, born 1971) for House of Balenciaga (French, founded 1937) Dress, spring/summer 2003 Courtesy of Balenciaga Archives, Paris Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Yves Saint Laurent (French, 1936–2008) Evening dress, autumn/winter 1969–70 haute couture French Silk, bird-of-paradise feathers The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Gift of Baron Philippe de Rothschild, 1983 (1983.619.1a, b) Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Karl Lagerfeld (French, born Hamburg, 1938) for House of Chanel (French, founded 1913) Wedding ensemble (back view), autumn/winter 2014–15 haute couture Courtesy of CHANEL Patrimoine Collection Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

Shohei Shigematsu, director of OMA New York, designed a series of textile alcoves to house each piece, bringing attention to their texture and sartorial details. The vast selection includes iconic clothing from international stylists and luxury brands, and represents an exhaustive panoramic of modern fashion, showing how artisan skill and technology join together to make wearable masterpieces.

Iris van Herpen (Dutch, born 1984) Dress, autumn/winter 2013–14 haute couture Dutch Silicone, cotton The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Friends of The Costume Institute Gifts, 2015 (2016.14) Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Iris van Herpen (Dutch, born 1984) Ensemble, spring/summer 2010 haute couture Dutch Polyamide, acrylic, leather The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Purchase, Friends of The Costume Institute Gifts, 2015 (2016.16a, b) Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
170 avant garde prêt-à-porter and haute couture pieces that highlight the relationship between handmade and machine made are exhibited in the Met.
Issey Miyake (Japanese, born 1938) for Miyake Design Studio (Japanese, founded 1970) "Flying Saucer" dress, spring/summer 1994 Courtesy of The Miyake Issey Foundation Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Karl Lagerfeld (French, born Hamburg, 1938) for House of Chanel (French, founded 1913) Wedding ensemble, autumn/winter 2005–6 haute couture Courtesy of CHANEL Patrimoine Collection Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Christopher Kane (British, born 1982) Dress, spring/summer 2014 Courtesy of Christopher Kane Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
Raf Simons (Belgian, born 1968) for House of Dior (French, founded 1947) Ensemble, spring/summer 2015 haute couture Courtesy of Christian Dior Haute Couture Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope
The galleries are divided into the same categories used in Diderot’s 1751 encyclopedia; silk, leather, lace…
OMA’s silver alcoves resemble cathedral niches, placing the garment in the spotlight.
Hussein Chalayan (British, born Cyprus, 1970) "Kaikoku" floating dress, autumn/winter 2011–12 Courtesy of Swarovski Photo © Nicholas Alan Cope

WHERE: 1000 5th Ave, New York, NY 10028, Stati Uniti

New York’s Metropolitan Museum is showing a superb exhibition of 170 avant garde prêt-à-porter and haute couture pieces that highlight the relationship between handmade and machine made, pointing out the fertile, modern unity between artisan approach and technology in fashion. Curator Andrew Bolton expains that the collection dispels the dichotomy of hand and machine manufacturing, proposing a new paradigm for our digital age. Shohei Shigematsu, director of OMA New York, designed a series of textile alcoves to house each piece, bringing attention to their particular textures and sartorial details. The vast selection includes iconic clothing from international stylists and luxury brands, and represents an exhaustive panoramic of modern fashion, showing how artisan skill and technology join together to make wearable masterpieces.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.