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FAI celebrates the extraordinary art of Alfredo Ravasco, an innovative master of the Milanese goldsmith craft in the 20th century, with an exhibition at Villa Necchi Campiglio, in Milan. Curated by Paola Venturelli, the exhibition offers over 90 pieces, spread throughout the rooms of the villa, including one of the most precious centerpieces, as well as jewelry, decorative objects, and sacred art, a large part of which has never been viewed and is owned privately. The particular strength of this orginal, figurative artist is how he combined precious materials like malachite, agate, onyx, laspilazzuli and coral, with zoomorphic figures like octupi or fish, chiseled with extreme refinement. Reclining on hard, stone bases or entwined with blocks of lapislazzuli, fish and octupi, thanks to the virtuousity of the work, almost evoke revulsion, much like the real thing, fully entering the category of (precious) disgust, theorized by the philosophist Mario Perniola in his work entitled ‘Disgusti’ (Costa&Nolan, 1998).

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Alfredo Ravasco, Triptych with Stingray and two octopi on side
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The choice of materials, with its strong chromatic impact, generally includes stones that have varied and bright colours, including malachite, agate, onyx, lapislazzuli, and coral.
Ravasco, oltre ad affermarsi come creatore di gioielli, ha raggiunto in maniera raffinata la sua massima espressione artistica nella realizzazione di oggetti e complementi d'arredo, vere e proprie sculture e architetture in miniatura.
Ravasco was not only an established jewelry maker, but reached his maximum artistic expression in creating decorative and complimenting objects, true sculptures and miniature structures.
L'esposizione si inserisce nell'ambito dell'iniziativa Manualmente giunta alla quarta edizione e dedicata all'artigianato di alta qualità.
The selection of materials that define Alfredo Ravasco’s work reveal clear inspiration taken from sixteenth century goldsmith and mannerist practices, as well as the output of celebrated Milanese bottegas like Saracchi, Miseroni e Scala.
L'esposizione si inserisce nell'ambito dell'iniziativa Manualmente giunta alla quarta edizione e dedicata all'artigianato di alta qualità.
The exhibition is part of the initiative Manualmente, in its fourth edition, dedicated to high-quality artisan works.
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Centerpiece with coral; Alfredo Ravasco
La scelta dei materiali, dal forte impatto cromatico, ricade in genere su pietre dure dalle tinte variegate e vivaci, quali la malachite, l'agata, l'onice, il lapislazzuli, e i coralli
The choice of materials, with its strong chromatic impact, generally includes stones that have varied and bright colours, including malachite, agate, onyx, lapislazzuli, and coral.

WHERE: Villa Necchi Campiglio, Via Mozart, 14, 20122 Milano

FAI celebrates the extraordinary art of Alfredo Ravasco, an innovative master of the Milanese goldsmith craft in the 20th century, with an exhibition at Villa Necchi Campiglio, in Milan. Curated by Paola Venturelli, the exhibition offers over 90 pieces, spread throughout the rooms of the villa, including one of the most precious centerpieces, as well as jewelry, decorative objects, and sacred art, a large part of which has never been viewed and is owned privately. The particular strength of the orginal figurative artist is how he combined precious materials like malachite, agate, onyx, laspilazzuli and coral, with zoomorphic figures like octupi or fish, chiseled with extreme refinement. Reclining on hard, stone bases or entwined with blocks of lapislazzuli, fish and octupi, thanks to the virtuousity of the work, almost evoke revulsion, much like the real thing, fully entering the category of (precious) disgust, theorized by the philosophist Mario Perniola in his work entitled ‘Disgusti’ (Costa&Nolan, 1998).

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.