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The St. Ermin’s building was once used by the British Secret Services as its headquarters. It is the only place in London with strong historical ties to espionage that is also open to the public

St. Ermin’s Hotel, a 4-star luxury hotel in the centre of London, is situated just a short walk from St. James Park. It is a hotel truly rich in history; it is known that, from the 30s until the end of WWII, secret meetings and covert operations of the British secret service were carried out within its walls. It is said that in the ’50s, Russian spies met in its elegant rooms to get secret information. Today, conspiracies and plots have given way to relaxed customers and tourists visiting the city, but also to hives of bees raised on one of the terraces and producing excellent honey.

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The entrance to St. Ermin’s Hotel lit for the holiday season

There are plenty of curiosities concerning St. Ermin’s Hotel, but even more so are the architectural influences that have shaped its spaces, recently re-designed by the designer Dayna Lee of Powerstrip Studio. The hotel is a listed building that reflects influences of Rococo, Art Nouveau, and Baroque. The tiered lobby is really impressive, with its balconies – yet another curiosity – reminiscent of a theatre. They date to around 1900, attributable to the famous Victorian theatre designer J. P. Briggs. A more contemporary atmosphere characterizes instead the Caxton Bar, with its guestrooms having more of a country feeling with references to botanical science and to nature in general.

Designed by Dayna Lee, the guestrooms are more country in style. The hotel’s 331 spacious rooms, of which 41 are suites, make guests feel at home
The majestic lobby immediately calls to mind the foyer of a theatre, most probably because architect J.P. Briggs, who found it difficult to distance himself from theatre, designed it!
The dining room of the Caxton Grill
The Caxton Bar, once a meeting place for secret agents and covert operations
Hives occupy one of the hotel balconies and every year, between April and May or in September, the hotel organizes workshops on the art of honey making
A private bathroom in one of the suites. The hotel also offers mini-apartments for families, with extra beds and, what is more, two bathrooms

WHERE: 2 Caxton Street, London SW1H 0QW, UK

St. Ermin’s Hotel, a 4-star luxury hotel in the centre of London, is situated just a short walk from St. James Park. It is a hotel truly rich in history; it is known that, from the 30s until the end of WWII, secret meetings and covert operations of the British secret service were carried out within its walls. It is said that in the ’50s, Russian spies met in its elegant rooms to get secret information.
Today, conspiracies and plots have given way to relaxed customers and tourists visiting the city, but also to hives of bees raised on one of the terraces and producing excellent honey.
There are plenty of curiosities concerning St. Ermin’s Hotel, but even more so are the architectural influences that have shaped its spaces, recently re-designed by the designer Dayna Lee of Powerstrip Studio.
The hotel is a listed building that reflects influences of Rococo, Art Nouveau, and Baroque. The tiered lobby is really impressive, with its balconies – yet another curiosity – reminiscent of a theatre. They date to around 1900, attributable to the famous Victorian theatre designer J. P. Briggs. A more contemporary atmosphere characterizes instead the Caxton Bar, with its guestrooms having more of a country feeling with references to botanical science and to nature in general.

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The Moodboarders is a glance into the design world, which, in all of its facets, captures the extraordinary even within the routine. It is a measure of the times. It is an antenna sensitive enough to pick-up on budding trends, emerging talents and neglected aesthetics. Instead of essays, we use brief tales to tune into the rhythm of our world. We travelled for a year without stopping, and seeing as the memory of this journey has not faded, we have chosen to edit a printed copy. We eliminated anything episodic, ephemeral or fading, maintaining a variety of articles that flow, without losing the element of surprise, the events caught taking place, and the creations having just bloomed.